Category Archives: Publications

Real Estate Parables

Real Estate Escapes – SPECIAL PRICE for Christmas 2019

Another inexpensive Christmas gift idea that informs, protects and warns….

$15.00 from For Pity Sake Publishers

For the real estate enthusiast – Real Estate Escapes by nationally recognised ‘real estate watchdog’ and consumer advocate , Tim O’Dwyer , is just the ticket at only $15.00.

[Tim is a member of our New Farm Explorers group.]

When ‘sold’ isn’t sold and ‘Off-the-Plan’ is just ‘off’

Real Estate Escapes is a collection of timeless property parables where not all agents, solicitors and conveyancers are created equal, and where not all escapes are successful. Drawing from over four decades experience, Tim O’Dwyer combines his deep knowledge of the subject with an uncanny ability to explain, in a simple and entertaining way, these true tales of getting out of contracts, leases, prosecutions and legal liability.

Real Estate Escapes is more than an informative consumer guide. It’s also a really good read – riveting stories of the traps, rorts and misunderstandings that abound in the real estate industry. I highly recommend you read it BEFORE venturing into the minefield.”

– Helen Wellings – Channel Seven Consumer Affairs Reporter

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Christmas Gift Ideas

We are very fortunate to have many productive authors in the Progressive Christian movement. Some have made a major focus on Christmas.

Here are three that you might like to consider when looking for gifts for thinking friends or even for yourself:

Available from Barnes and Noble with free delivery.

  • Rex’s Book has been a great reference for many seminars.

Available directly from Rex Hunt.

  • Borg and Crossan are leading scholars of the historical Jesus.

Available from Amazon.

Enjoy the season!

Paul

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The Impact of the Death of Christianity on Australian Society

Predicting social trends is usually an inexact science, but England’s influential Spectator magazine has boldly put a precise date on the disappearance of Christianity from Britain: 2067.

“What does all this mean? …. First, that reports of Christianity’s demise in the West are greatly exaggerated; and second, that to the extent it does disappear, it will be greatly missed…

The churches will have fewer nominal attendees, so that members are more committed. As they continue their good works, but without much of the moralising of the recent past, the faith will become more attractive. It will be like the fourth century – before Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire and began its fateful courtship of power and authority….

Much of Australia’s social capital over the past two centuries was built by Christians, explicitly motivated by their faith to work not just for themselves but for the community at large. They believed they were called to love their neighbour – all their neighbours – and brought their (now-maligned) “Protestant work ethic” to bear on the problems and challenges of their time. The economy, and in particular the siren call of profit, is the only language that seems to move government or business now. Or at least, it is the most heard….”

To see the full article by Barney Zwartz from the Centre for Public Christianity go to:

Christianity is dying out? Don’t count on it.

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The latest from Kevin Treston now available

Opening Doors: A Seeker’s reflections on the rooms of Christian living
Listen! I am standing at the door, knocking; if you hear my voice and open the door, I will come in to you and eat with you, and you with me. (Revelation 3:20) Opening Doors: A Seeker’s Reflections on the Rooms of Christian Living takes seriously the invitation of the Lord for us to open the door to him, and with confidence consider how our faith may be enhanced and energised through the wisdoms of contemporary theology and spirituality.
The book is written for those whom Charles Taylor describes as ‘seekers’ – Christians who are searching to reconcile their faith with emerging insights from modern science, cosmology and consciousness.
We are invited to open eleven doors and enter eleven rooms of Christian living. Each room offers a flavour of each of the topics in the Christian Story followed by focused questions for individual reflection and shared conversations in self-directed groups. The topics of the rooms include everyday spirituality, the universe story, humans and religion, the mystery of God, meeting Jesus, the church, ministry, women and faith communities, a Christian ethical way of life, Christian spiritualities and faith communities in a global world.
Kevin Treston graduated BA (Hons), MA (Hons), MEd., PhD (University of Notre Dame USA) and pursued post-doctoral studies in Washington, Boston and Chicago. He was visiting Scholar at Boston College and is a member of the Association of Practical Theology Oceania. He has worked in ministry across Australia and many countries.
To order online go to: www.coventrypress.com.au
Phone: 0477 809 037
Email: enquiries@coventrypress.com.au
Post to: Coventry Press, 33 Scoresby Road, Bayswater Vic
Opening Doors @ $24.95
*Postage: $9.95 for 1-3 books; $11 for 4 and more; free freight for orders over $100
OPENING DOORS
A Seeker’s reflections on the rooms of Christian living
Kevin Treston
Coventry Press
9780648566106 — $24.95

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Towards a Partnership Society in Australia

Not Just a Dream by one of our subscribers, Bev Floyd, poet and author

Not Just a Dream is my attempt to explore how far Australia has travelled along the path to a partnership society. I have not tried to write a learned or academic book. My aim has been to give a panoramic overview of social change from circa 7000 BCE to the present and to illustrate (with examples) the gradual ‘return’ to a partnership society.
My definition of a partnership society is one in which ‘men’ and ‘women’ participate equally and can reach their potential to contribute to society. It is a society where poverty is minimised; race and religion are not hindrances to contribution and the environment is protected. I have tried to describe what a Partnership Society, ¹ might be like in various areas such as business, gender, the environment etc.
I have been influenced by a book called The Chalice and the Blade by Riane Eisler… a work of enormous scope and impeccable research….

It is my hope that Not Just a Dream will clarify issues around contemporary trends and events that threaten our world—that it can be a blue-print for everyone seeking to hasten the return of an inclusive society free of war and want, a society filled with peace, happiness and love….

PARTNERSHIP AND GLADIATORIAL MODELS COMPARED
The partnership model The partnership model is a mediator model rather than a gladiatorial model. People who support this model are active peacemakers. They believe in participation, compassion, inclusiveness. They are kind-hearted and thoughtful. Their role is to take care of children and the family. From early childhood, they develop nurturing skills. They have a full emotional range and use it in their role as peacemakers. Around them develops a flat management system where everyone is valued for themselves without a need to prove their worth. Their role is a virtuous and beautiful one. More females than males are in this category but there are also many males.
Equality for females is extremely important to social change as women are more closely aligned to the partnership model of life and when their voice is truly heard and respected then society is more likely to change for the better.

The gladiatorial model The role of gladiators is to fight. They are reared knowing they will be gladiators and are trained for their role. They are competitive, heroic and tough. They must be courageous and have an intense will to win. In times of war they are in the forefront of the battle and keep the rest of their community safe. The most successful gladiators develop leadership skills, are decisive and good in crises. They learn to guard their emotions and to switch them off when hard decisions are required. Around them develops a hierarchical system where they test their strength and courage against the next gladiator on the ladder. The hierarchical system is valued also for its ability to instil obedience to commands as well as ensuring quick and effective responses to dangerous situations. Gladiators are generally male although not always.

Amongst many of Bev’s publications, she has made this one free, online. Go to: Not just a Dream

Contents
Introduction 1. Not just a dream 2. Social change we have inherited 3. Australia, the lucky country 4. Signs of the times 5. Governance within a partnership society 6. Husbands and wives 7. Religion within a partnership society 8. Gender in a partnership society 9. Growing older in a partnership society 10. Doing business in a partnership society 11. Minding the environment 12. Role of the media in a partnership society 13. Creativity in a partnership society 14. Ethics, responsibility and regulation 15. Australia’s future role in the world

To find other publications from Bev Floyd go to: Bev Floyd

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A timely Vision for a Just Australia – from the UCA

“Our vision, grounded in the life and mission of Jesus, is for a nation which: • is characterised by love for one another, of peace with justice, of healing and reconciliation, of welcome and inclusion. • recognises the equality and dignity of each person. • recognises sovereignty of First Peoples, has enshrined a First Peoples voice and is committed to truth telling about our history. • takes seriously our responsibility to care for the whole of creation. • is outward looking, a generous and compassionate contributor to a just world.”

Our Vision for a Just Australia: Foundations – The Uniting Church’s vision and hope for a just Australia is expressed in seven Foundational Areas, the first four of which are set out below:
An Economy for Life • Our government makes economic decisions that put people first: decisions that are good for creation, that lift people out of poverty and fairly share our country’s wealth. • The economy serves the well-being and flourishing of all people.
An Inclusive and Equal Society • We live together in a society where all are equal and free to exercise our rights equally, regardless of faith, cultural background, race, age, sexual orientation and gender identity. • We defend those rights for all.
Flourishing Communities – Regional, Remote & Urban • We live in communities where we are connected and we care for one another. • In communities all over Australia, from our big cities to remote regions, we seek the well-being of each Australian and uplift those who are on the margins.
Contributing to a Just and Peaceful World • Australia acts with courage and conviction to build a just and peaceful world. • We are a nation that works in partnership with other nations to dismantle the structural and historical causes of violence, injustice and inequality. Our government upholds human rights everywhere, acting in the best interests of all people and the planet.

The full document is available at: UCA Vision for A Just Australia

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New Publication from Tom Drake-Brockman

Now available from Wipf and Stock Publishers (US) or Amazon Australia as hard, paper back or digital copy.

Jesus was murdered by the Jewish religious leaders whose power base was the temple of Jerusalem. Saul of Tarsus–later the Paul of Christianity–was one of these, and his brand of faith theology mirrored their theology of covenantal entitlement. Thus, Christianity’s basic theological principles derive from those who killed Jesus.This is just one of many challenging propositions backed with strong evidence that appear in this book. Jesus, like most Jews, was attuned to faithfulness rather than pure faith, to ethical behavior based on human empathy rather than metaphysical beliefs and rituals.The central focus of Jesus was hesed, the heart of the Jewish covenant with God which linked God’s mercy to human compassion and forgiveness, making both mutually interactive. This hesed forgiveness was anathema to the temple’s faux forgiveness and threatened its very existence.Therefore, Jesus came not to save us, but to show us how to save ourselves. Reinterpreting a key parable of Jesus in this light, the Parable of the Tares, Jesus can be most plausibly understood as an incarnation of Adam, the original prototype human who God, in Genesis, appointed to oversee his creation and guide our spiritual evolution. His mission was not about any sacrificial death, but about establishing the spiritual humanism of Judaic hesed as the central purpose of human existence.

The Author: Tom Drake-Brockman has several degrees, including a Master of Theology from Charles Sturt University. In completing this course, he twice received the Dean’s Award for Academic Excellence. He has also taught secondary school history and has had articles published in university journals, as well as an opinion piece on the subject of his book in The Australian newspaper.

Other Book by this author: Christian Humanism reviewed by Rex Hunt for Insights magazine (NSW UCA Synod).

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Engaging Spirituality in an Emerging Universe

[This Thesis is brought to you for free and open access by the Document Types at ACU Research Bank. It has been accepted for inclusion in Theses by an authorized administrator of ACU Research Bank. For more information, please contact LibResearch@acu.edu.au. Follow this and additional works at: https://researchbank.acu.edu.au/theses
Part of the Religious Thought, Theology and Philosophy of Religion Commons  ]

When Heaven and Earth Embrace:
How Do We Engage Spiritually in an Emerging Universe?

Mary M. Tinney, PhD
Australian Catholic University

Sr Mary Tinney, RSM has been the founder and coordinator of Earth Link a community which envisions a world where there is respect, reverence and care for the whole Earth community. They believe that the heart of this lies in deepening our bond with Earth. Earth Link is endorsed by the Sisters of Mercy, and open to all who share their concern for the whole Earth community.

Abstract: In this thesis I am proposing that we can engage spiritually in an emerging Universe if we have a vision of the embrace of Heaven and Earth that is informed by contemporary science, if we underpin that with an ecotheology that recognises Heaven and Earth as interconnected while respecting their differences, and if we have an ecospiritual praxis that is open, attentive to and aware of divine presence in all that is. I am convinced that a vision of the embrace of Heaven and Earth has the potential to drive action for justice for Earth at a time when there is ecological devastation in our evolving cosmos. This vision is at the heart of Christian ecospirituality in an emerging universe. Using the craft of practical theology, the thesis is a study of how one community group, Earth Link, engages spiritually in an emerging universe in a way that moves it to transformative practice towards its vision of a world where there is “respect, reverence and care for the whole Earth community.” The dialogue partners in the process are Thomas Berry and Elizabeth Johnson in the fields of ecospirituality and
ecotheology respectively, with some reference to Laudato Si, the 2015 encyclical of Pope Francis. The thesis concludes by proposing enhanced principles for Earth Link in the light of this dialogue. The author is the instigator and currently the facilitator of Earth Link, so approaches the work as both participant and observer.

Submitted by Mary M Tinney, B A (UQ), M Ed (Boston College), M Pastoral Studies (Loyola, Chicago), School of Theology, Faculty of Theology and Philosophy, McAuley Campus, Brisbane,
in fulfilment of the requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy. ACU Graduate Research Office, Level 16, 8-20 Napier St, North Sydney NSW 2060.  Date of submission: 16/10/2017

Mary has been awarded a Doctor of Philosophy as a result of this research.

For the complete thesis, go to: https://researchbank.acu.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1713&context=theses

Thursday, 14 February, 11am Brisbane time. Mary Tinney will be providing insights into her thesis, When Heaven and Earth Embrace: How Do We Engage Spiritually in an Emerging Universe? Register here. A recording will be available afterwards.

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Book: The Ending of Mark’s Gospel: the key to understanding the gospels and Christianity

Dr Peter Lewis has kindly made available his new publication at cost to interested readers. You can get this from Peter for $20 posted in Australia.  It has 56 A4 pages and contains three of his articles plus an Introduction and other material. To reduce the cost it has wire binding. Enquiries to pelew3@gmail.com

See our recent post – An Explanation for the Abrupt Ending of Mark’s Gospel for some background to Peter’s research.

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Just published – White Woman Black Heart

Mapoon community is situated on the traditional lands of the Tjungundji people.  A church mission commenced near Trathalarrakwana (unconfirmed spelling of a Tjungundji word meaning ‘Barramundi story place’) or Cullen Point on 28 November 1891.  Mapoon Mission was established under the name Batavia River Mission by Moravian missionaries on behalf of the Presbyterian Church of Australia, with Queensland Government financial assistance, on land reserved by the Government under the Crown Lands Act of 1884.   Within a few years the mission became known as Mapoon, a Tjungundji word meaning  ‘place where people fight on the sand-hills’.   Mapoon is also known as Marpuna.  As the influence of the mission widened in the surrounding lands, the reserve was extended south to the Mission River near Weipa.  Some of the traditional owner groups who eventually came to live at Mapoon included the Mpakwithi, Taepithiggi, Thaynhakwith, Warrangku, Wimarangga and Yupungathi people.

The story of the closure of Mapoon in 1964 meshes into the sad history of resettlement that was occurring widely. By 1984 traditional owners were coming back. I (Paul Inglis) visited Mapoon in 1985 while doing research for Comalco in Weipa and saw where the settlement had been destroyed and the beginning of rebuilding.

Barbabra Miller tells the story beautifully. Thanks Noel Preston for sending the details.

White Woman, Black Heart recites, with powerful eloquence, an amazing story: the personal journey of the author and the heroic resilience of the Mapoon Aboriginal Community from the Western Cape. The author, Barbara Miller, has lived in Cairns for more than four decades. I (Noel Preston) first met her soon after she published the story of the Aboriginal people ejected from the Mapoon settlement on Cape York in the late 1960s. This community had been conducted by the Presbyterian church in conjunction with the State government. The devastating impact on these indigenous Australians was an injustice inherited by the Uniting Church. Miller’s account weaves her own story with that of the Mapoon people (some of whom have now returned to their original land). Miller continued her advocacy for First Australians in various roles in the north such as being part of the original founding team of the North Queensland Land Council with her first husband, Mick Miller, and in the 1990s as CEO of the Aboriginal Coordinating Council which represented Aboriginal local government councils.

This enthralling personal memoir, with its incredibly detailed recollections, extends from the turbulent times of the sixties and seventies to the present which she shares with husband Norman in pastoral ministry. White Woman, Black Heart is also an inspiring testimony to the empowering convergence between her authentic spirituality and her never-ending struggle for social justice. As a contribution to the history of that political struggle in Queensland and the Western Cape particularly, it is important for scholars, activists and all who are committed to supporting the First Australians find their rightful place in Australian society.

To purchase: Either through Amazon or from Barbara Miller. Other publications by Barbara Miller are also available at this site.

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